Heart Disease Risk Blood Test
    Heart Disease Risk Blood Test
    Heart Disease Risk Blood Test
    Heart Disease Risk Blood Test
    Heart Disease Risk Blood Test

Heart Disease Risk Blood Test

£49.00

The Heart Disease Risk Blood Test looks at the main risk factors for heart disease including cholesterol and high sensitivity CRP a measure of damaging inflammation.

Results estimated in 3 working days

View 7 Biomarkers

How do you want to take your sample?

Please choose one option below
  • Collect your own finger-prick blood sample at home   Free

    We’ll send you everything you need to collect your blood sample from your finger at home.
  • Book a venous draw at a clinic   +£35.00

  • Book a venous draw at home with a nurse +£59.00

  • Self-arrange a professional sample collection Free

Heart Disease Risk Blood Test

Find your nearest clinic
Key: You are here Appointment required Walk-in service

Biomarker table

Cholesterol status

Total cholesterol

Learn more

Cholesterol is an essential fat (lipid) in the body. Although it has a bad reputation it has some important functions, including building cell membranes and producing a number of essential hormones including testosterone and oestradiol. Cholesterol is manufactured in the liver and also comes from the food we eat. Although there are a number of different types of cholesterol, the two main components of total cholesterol are HDL (high density lipoprotein) which is protective against heart disease and LDL (low density lipoprotein) which, in high levels, can contribute to cardiovascular disease. Your total cholesterol result on its own is of limited value in understanding your risk of heart disease; high levels of HDL cholesterol can cause a raised total cholesterol result but may actually be protective against heart disease. Equally, you can have a normal total cholesterol level but have low levels of protective HDL cholesterol. The most important factors are how much HDL and LDL cholesterol you have, and what proportion of your total cholesterol is made up of protective HDL cholesterol. We give a detailed breakdown of the components of your total cholesterol in the rest of this cholesterol profile.

LDL cholesterol

Learn more

LDL cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein) is a molecule made of lipids and proteins which transports cholesterol, triglycerides and other fats to various tissues throughout the body. Too much LDL cholesterol, commonly called 'bad cholesterol', can cause fatty deposits to accumulate inside artery walls, potentially leading to atherosclerosis and heart disease.

Non-HDL cholesterol

Learn more

Your total cholesterol is broken down into 2 main components; HDL (good) cholesterol and LDL (bad). There are more types of harmful cholesterol in your blood than just LDL - these include VLDL (very low-density lipoproteins) and other lipoproteins which are thought to be even more harmful than LDL cholesterol. Non-HDL cholesterol is calculated by subtracting your HDL cholesterol value from your total cholesterol. It therefore includes all the non-protective and potentially harmful cholesterol in your blood, not just LDL. As such, it is considered to be a better marker for cardiovascular risk than total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. The recommended level of non-HDL cholesterol is below 4 mmol/L.

HDL cholesterol

Learn more

HDL cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein) is a molecule in the body which removes cholesterol from the bloodstream and transports it to the liver where it is broken down and removed from the body in bile. HDL cholesterol is commonly known as 'good cholesterol'.

Total cholesterol : HDL

Learn more

The cholesterol/HDL ratio is calculated by dividing your total cholesterol value by your HDL cholesterol level. It is used as a measure of cardiovascular risk because it gives a good insight into the proportion of your total cholesterol which is good (i.e. high-density lipoprotein HDL). Heart disease risk tools (such as QRisk) use the cholesterol/HDL ratio to calculate your risk of having a heart attack.

Triglycerides

Learn more

Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) that circulate in the blood. After you eat, your body converts excess calories (whether from fat or carbohydrates) into triglycerides which are then transported to cells to be stored as fat. Your body then releases triglycerides when required for energy.

Inflammation

hs-CRP

Learn more

C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is an inflammation marker used to assess whether there is inflammation in the body - it does not identify where the inflammation is located. High Sensitivity CRP (CRP-hs) is a test used to detect low-level inflammation thought to damage blood vessels which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. When you suffer a serious injury or infection you experience significant inflammation around the site of injury - such as the swelling around a twisted ankle. Any injury like this will cause your CRP-hs to rise.
Special instructions

How to prepare for your test

Prepare for your Heart Disease Risk Blood Test by following these instructions. Take this test when any symptoms of short-term illness have settled. Avoid fatty foods for eight hours before your test, you do not need to fast.

Blood testing made easy

How it works

Your personalised, actionable health results are only a few clicks away. Order your test, take and post your sample, then view your results online with our doctors' comments.

Your results, simplified

Track, improve, and monitor your health over time

MyMedichecks is your personal online dashboard where you can view your results, access clear and simple explanations about individual health markers, monitor changes in your health, and securely store information about your medical history, lifestyle, and vital statistics.

FAQs

What is a heart disease risk test?

Our Heart Disease Risk Blood Test looks at important risk factors that may lead to heart disease in the future. It measures your cholesterol - specifically your ratio of HDL (good) cholesterol to LDL (bad) cholesterol.

What could my results indicate?

A high ratio of HDL to LDL cholesterol (above 20%) is protective against heart disease. With this test, you'll get a measure of triglycerides (a measure of the actual fat in your blood) and CRP-hs (a marker for inflammation in the body). High LDL cholesterol coupled with inflamed arteries is thought to be a dangerous combination that can lead to deposits of plaque on artery walls.

Who is most at risk for heart disease?

Everybody has a different risk of developing heart disease, based on your general health, lifestyle, and if you have a family history of the disease.

Our latest customer reviews