Advanced Vitamins Blood Test, from our experts to you.
Dr Sam Rodgers MBBS, MRCGP

Chief Medical Officer meet our doctors

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What's included?

Red blood cells
Vitamins
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Haematocrit HCT (haematocrit) measures the amount of space (volume) within the blood that is taken up by red blood cells.
MCHC MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the average concentration of haemoglobin in your red blood cells. Haemoglobin is a molecule which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen around the body.
Vitamin A Vitamin A (retinol) is a fat-soluble vitamin found in animal products such as eggs, dairy, liver and kidneys. It is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and foetus.
Beta carotene Beta-carotene is a fat-soluble carotenoid found in plants, and is what gives carrots their orange colour. Your body converts beta-carotene into vitamin A (retinol) and is a safe source of vitamin A because your body only converts as much as it needs. Excess vitamin A can be toxic. Vitamin A is important for the normal reproduction of cells (cellular differentiation) as well as good vision and the proper development of an embryo and fetus. Beta-carotene is also an antioxidant so protects the body from damaging free radicals. Sources of beta-carotene include carrots, tomatoes, spinach, lettuce, sweet potatoes, squash and broccoli.
Vitamin B1 The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells. Thiamine (B1) is a water-soluble vitamin required to form adenosine triphosphate which all cells in the body need.
Vitamin B2 The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.
Vitamin B3 The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.
Vitamin B6 The B vitamins are a group of 8 all water-soluble vitamins, all crucial for cell metabolism, converting food into energy, the normal functioning of the central nervous system and the formation of red blood cells.
Folate - Red Cell Folate is a B vitamin which acts as a coenzyme in the metabolism of amino acids. It is also vital for the synthesis of purines and pyrimidines which are essential for DNA synthesis and red cell formation. Folate is also especially important during the first trimester of pregnancy so if you are thinking of becoming pregnant it is important to make sure your folate levels are normal. Red Cell Folate is a measure of the body's store of the vitamin folate.
Vitamin B12 - active Vitamin B12 is important for production of red blood cells which carry oxygen around the body. B12 is also involved in metabolism and the nervous system and prolonged lack of vitamin B12 may cause nerve damage. Although Vitamin B12 is almost entirely found in animal-based foods, many vegetarian and vegan products, especially plant milks are now fortified with Vitamin B12.
Vitamin C Vitamin C is a water soluble vitamin found in many fruits and vegetables including oranges, peppers, strawberries, blackcurrants, tomatoes and potatoes. Vitamin C is crucial for growth and repair of tissues, healing wounds, healthy bones and teeth and assisting the body with collagen production and iron absorption. It is also an antioxidant so fights off damaging free radicals.
Vitamin D Although called a vitamin, vitamin D is actually a hormone which is activated by sunshine on your skin. Vitamin D is essential for bone strength as it helps your intestines absorb calcium. However, it is thought that vitamin D also plays an important role in immune function, as well as in many chronic diseases and mental health. Many people in the UK have low levels of vitamin D with symptoms including muscle weakness, mood swings and fatigue. People who have dark skin, as well as those who don't spend much time outdoors are particularly at risk of low vitamin D. Small amounts of vitamin D can be obtained from food, especially oily fish, eggs and any food which has been fortified with vitamin D. If you are deficient in vitamin D you are unlikely to be able to improve your levels by food alone.
Vitamin E - alpha tocopherol Vitamin E is an antioxidant important in protecting body tissue from damage caused by unstable substances called free radicals, which are produced by cigarette smoke, sunlight, pollution and chemical reactions in the body. Vitamin E is also important in the formation of red blood cells, keeping the immune system healthy and helps the body to use vitamin K.

How to prepare
for your test

Special instructions

Prepare for your Advanced Vitamins Blood Test by following these instructions. Do not eat for 12 hours prior to your test. Drink plenty of water, if you take medication then you are allowed to take it as you would normally. You should take this test before you take any medication or vitamin/mineral supplements. Do not take biotin supplements for two days before this test, discuss this with your doctor if it is prescribed. Do not take vitamin B12 for two weeks prior to this test. If your B12 is prescribed ask your doctor whether to stop. Wrap your sample in foil immediately after it is taken.


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