Thrombotic
Risk Profile

£549

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check_circle25 tests included
invert_colors Venous blood sample   info
schedule5 day turnaround   info

Key benefits

1

Accurate tests
from accredited laboratories

2

Easy-to-use
test kits you can do at home

3

Confidential results
provided securely online

4

Qualified doctors
will interpret your results

Thrombotic Risk Profile

About this test

The Thrombotic Risk Profile is a genetic blood test. Results for the Thrombotic Risk Profile are available within 5 days.

How it works

Collect Sample

We send you an easy-to-use kit to collect your blood sample.

Post Sample

Post your sample to our lab in the prepaid envelope provided.

View Results

View results securely in your own personal dashboard.

Important Information

Our tests are not a substitute for seeing your doctor, especially if you are suffering symptoms. Our doctors will interpret your results based on the information you have provided, but will not diagnose, consult or provide any treatment. You will be advised to see your doctor for any necessary follow-up action.

Tests Included

Red Blood Cells

HCT (haemocrit) measures the amount of space (volume) red blood cells take up in the blood.

Raised levels can result from pregnancy, living at altitude, dehydration as well as low availability of oxygen through chronic lung disease and even sleep apnoea.

Low levels indicate anaemia.

Red blood cell (RBC) count analyses the number of red cells in the blood. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. They also carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs so that it can be exhaled. 

A high count (thicker blood) means there is a chance that the red blood cells will clump together and block tiny blood vessels. This also makes it difficult for your red blood cells to carry oxygen.

A low count (anaemia) means that your body may not be getting the oxygen it needs and can be caused by nutritional deficiency (lack of iron, folic acid, vitamin B12), over-hydration as well as bleeding and bone marrow disorders. 

MCV (mean corpuscular volume) reflects the size of your red blood cells. 

A high result may indicate a vitamin deficiency of folate or vitamin B12 and is often seen in excessive alcohol consumption associated with liver inflammation. 

A low result indicates anaemia, often caused by iron deficiency.

MCH (mean corpuscular haemoglobin) is the average amount of haemoglobin contained in your red blood cells. 

Together with MCV and MCHC, MCH results can help in the diagnosis of different types of anaemia. 

MCHC (mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration) is the concentration of haemoglobin in an average red blood cell.

A high level can indicate the presence of spherocytes (a type of red bood cell with too much haemoglobin) or a deficiency of folic acid and vitamin B12 in the diet.

A low level can indicate chronic blood loss or too little iron.

RDW (red cell distribution width) shows whether the cells are all the same size or different sizes or shapes. Normally cells are fairly uniform, although a raised RDW result (indicating greater variaton in cell size and shape than is normally seen) can be caused by deficiency in iron, vitamin B12 or folic acid. 

White Blood Cells

White blood cells are key to your body's immune or defence system. They fight infections and protect your body from foreign invaders such as harmful germs and bacteria. 

A raised white blood cell (WBC) count can indicate recent infection, inflammation, trauma and even stress. Your WBC can also be raised when taking certain medications.

A decreased WBC can result from a vitamin deficiency such as folate or vitamin B12, as well as liver disease and diseases of the immune system. 

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that are responsible for helping your body fight infection. When neutrophils are low you can be more vulnerable to illness and infection.

Neutrophils can be raised after severe stress on the body from a bacterial infection, recent exercise or sudden kidney failure. 

Low neutrophils can be casued by a deficiency in vitamin B12 or folic acid, severe bacterial infection and some autoimmune diseases. 

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell which fight bacterial and viral infections. They include T cells, B cells and natural killer cells. 

Lymphocytes can be elevated for many reasons but it is common for them to be raised after recent infection, particularly after the flu. They can also be raised due to autoimmune disorders and some cancers. 

The most common cause for lymphocytes to be depleted is the common cold. 

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell that engulf and remove pathogens and dead or damaged cells from our blood. The heat and swelling of inflammation is caused by the activities of these cells. 

Elevated monocytes can indicate chronic inflammatory disease, chronic infection, parasitic infection and Cushings disease. 

Low levels can be due to autoimmune disorders such as lupus and rheumatoid arthiritis as well as drugs which affect the bone marrow such as those used in chemotherapy. 

Eosinophils are a type of white blood  cell whose function is to remove parasitic infections as well as to regulate inflammation to mark an infected site. 

Levels of eosinophils can be elevated if the scale of inflammation is greater than necessary to control the damage (as is the case in asthma and allergic responses) as well as in parasitic and fungal infections, autoimmune diseases and skin disorders. 

Low levels of eosinophils are not usually cause for concern and can be caused by the administration of steroids. 

Basophils are a type of white blood cell that protect your body from bacteria and parasites such as ticks. They produce histamine and heparin and can respond incorrectly causing allergies, asthma and other inflammatory conditions.

An elevated basophil count can be due to inflammatory conditions such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and dermatitis, recent infection and hormone imbalance (e.g. hypothyroidism).

A low basophil count can be caused by pregnancy, stress and use of steroids.

Clotting Screen

Platelets or clotting cells are the smallest type of blood cell and are important in blood clotting. When bleeding occurs, the platelets swell, clump together and form a sticky plug (a clot) which helps stop the bleeding. 

If platelet levels are raised there is an increased risk of blood clots forming in blood vessels.

If platelet levels are too low there is a risk of easy bruising and uncontrolled bleeding. 

Laboratory appointment in London

Your Blood sample will be analysed at our chosen laboratory based in the heart of London's medical district. You can be assured of fast, accurate results from the UK's largest independent provider of clinical diagnostic tests

Private laboratory analysis

Your blood sample will be analysed at one of our chosen laboratories. You can be assured of fast, accurate results from one of our accredited independent providers of clinical diagnostic tests.

Interpretation of results

Our medical team will comment on out-of-range blood test results and give you follow-up advice where necessary. If you need it, a PDF copy of your Thrombotic Risk Profile test results can be downloaded for your doctor.

Secure online account with mymedichecks.com

Once you have placed your order you will receive login details to mymedichecks.com where you can manage your account, track your orders and view your Thrombotic Risk Profile test results.

Health and Lifestyle tracker

Stay motivated by filling in your online health and lifestyle questionnaire and seeing how improvements in your lifestyle can influence your test results. Your medical and family history gives us vital information when interpreting your results.

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